Coming Together to Survive Climate Catastrophe

Although some people have lost everything in the U.S. southeast, this pales in comparison to the effects of Hurricane Matthew on the people of Haiti. Already over 1,000 people in Haiti have been killed by the Category 4 storm, making it the deadliest Atlantic Hurricane in over a decade. Our hearts are with everyone who lost loved ones, especially those in Haiti who are continuing to bear the brunt of climate change induced extreme weather caused by the industrialized, developed, fossil-fuel addicted nations like the U.S. If you are able, in lieu of sending Mutual Aid Disaster Relief monetary donations at this time, consider supporting one of these Haitian-led development-oriented organizations that are responding to Hurricane Matthew: ...

Towards a Conscious, Collective Aid Response

The summer of 2016 has shown that the effects of climate change are not distant fears, but current realities. However, instead of changing course, those in power are stepping up efforts to exacerbate the climate chaos. But from the no new lease on the gulf movement to the Camp of the Sacred Stones, people are resisting these threats to our survival. The historic flooding in Louisiana is being called the worst disaster since Hurricane Sandy hit New York. Tens of thousands of homes have been affected and over a hundred thousand people have applied for disaster assistance. Over the weekend in Baton Rouge, 40 of our volunteers engaged in gutting five homes affected by historic and deadly floods. We were able to assist homeowners in gutting several more homes today...

MAD Relief Baton Rouge Flood Response

When historic flood waters overtook Baton Rouge, Louisiana, Mutual Aid Disaster Relief contacted the affected communities on the ground and within hours were setting up a communal space for volunteers to gather, putting a call out to amplify the requests of those fighting to save their homes, items wish lists were mass-circulated and volunteers on the ground began assembling crews and affinity groups to respond alongside Baton Rouge residents for gutting, mucking and cleanup efforts. ...

A horizontal, multidimensional and multidirectional process

As natural disasters increase in intensity and frequency, we recognize that our hope for a livable future rests in developing resilient preparation for and response to crisis as individuals and communities, while simultaneously opposing intensive resource extraction and other root causes of climate change. We are engaged in a horizontal, multidimensional and multidirectional process that contributes to the liberation of everyone involved, not charitable acts. This means we share resources, skills, experience, knowledge and ideas without perpetuating relationships based on hierarchical power.